John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Powder Smiles

Smiles all around at the top of Bald Hill yesterday morning.

The posse was in good spirits at the top of Bald Hill yesterday morning as we transitioned for our first run in untracked powder. A perfect day!

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 14mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/400″ exposure.



A curious chipmunk gets close

We came across the crew of chipmunks on the top of what we’re now calling “Chipmunk Hill” up above East Street and Delfrate Road. They were not particularly shy. Several were bold enough to come within a couple of feet of us, and both Robin and I were wondering if they might crawl up our legs in their flighty curiosity.

Given that we didn’t have much cold weather in February, I wasn’t particularly surprised to see so much chipmunk activity. They spend the cold months in a torpor state (as opposed to true hibernation) and start emerging as the temperatures warm in March to kick off their spring breeding season. The seven or eight chipmunks we saw were no doubt “busy”…

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 140mm, ISO 800, f/9, 1/500″ exposure.


A moss covered rock emerges from a frozen vernal pool

While exploring the top of “Chipmunk Hill” the other day, we came across a couple of still frozen vernal pools. This moss covered rock looks like the iris of an eye carved in the ice.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 34mm, ISO 800, f/14, 1/500″ exposure.


Ripples & Ice

Ripples, pebbles, and ice in Fargo Brook

With the sun on the water, the right shutter speed accentuates the ripple distortions across the pebbles on the stream bed. A thin skim of ice provides something solid for the eye to rest on. I’ve found that between 1/200″ and 1/300″ exposure nails the effect.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.


Looking Up

Snow-bedecked hardwoods in the high country

The high country was a magical place yesterday as the sun came out and lit up the snow bedecked trees. I was up in the Lion’s Ridge area of the Camel’s Hump Nordic Ski Center yesterday where the powder was plentiful.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 14mm, ISO 400, f/14, 1/250″ exposure.


Who you lookin’ at?

A female cardinal seems to eye me suspiciously…

This female cardinal seemed to know she was on camera, giving me a fine “come hither” look over her shoulder as I snapped several shots. Of course she could also be thinking, “Hey, who you lookin’ at?”

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @ 300mm, ISO 1000, f/5.6, 1/200″ exposure.


Pan Ice

Discs of pan ice forming on Cobb Brook

Robin & I took a short hike up Cobb Brook yesterday afternoon. I was confident that we’d find some interesting ice formations among the stream’s numerous falls and cascades. We were not disappointed. The hilight was finding these ice discs or ice pans floating in the pool beneath one of the larger falls. These discs form as ice accumulates in slow moving eddy currents. The discs ranged in size here from around 16″ to over 3 feet.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 14mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/25″ exposure.


Hex Diamonds

Hexagonal plate ice crystals form between warm and cold air

Bundling up and marching off into the snow when it’s below zero has its rewards. These tiny and delicate hexagonal plate ice crystals formed along the bank of Fargo Brook where stream undercutting has exposed bare soils to the frigid air. When damp warmth filtering out of the ground meets the air the crystals form. These crystals were only a few millimeters wide so getting in close with a macro lens was necessary.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/16, 1/160″ exposure.


Window Frost

Ornate ice crystals form on the inside of our garage windows.

Sub-zero temperatures do have their advantages…

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 320, f/9, 1/640″ exposure.


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