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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Pushing Up

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Bloodroot pushing its way up through the moss

The bloodroot down by Fargo Brook is starting to push its way up out of the soil. This little shoot was less than a half-inch tall.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/125″ exposure.

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Taking Wing

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Grouse tracks and wing marks in the snow

I went for what might be one last ski up on Lion’s Ridge at Camel’s Hump Nordic yesterday. With spring coming on, there was all kinds of activity recorded in the snow. I saw tracks from turkeys, weasels, mice, bear—all going about their early spring businesses. I followed this ruffed grouse track to where the bird took flight leaving the impression of its wings in the soft snow.

Panasonic GM5, Lumix 12-32mm lens @  26mm, ISO 400, f/9, 1/1000″ exposure.

Bear Tracks

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Bear tracks in the woods up at Camel’s Hump Nordic!

I came across this set of bear tracks while skiing this morning up at Camel’s Hump Nordic (yup, there’s still a lot of snow up there!) I’m pretty sure I was looking at more than one bear walking in the same set of tracks—perhaps a mother and cubs?

Here’s a close up with my glove for scale. Big animal!

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Spring Robin

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A fresh spring arrival!

We’ve had a couple of robins hanging around all winter (judging by their accents, I’m guessing that they were Canadian…) and they’ve probably headed back north across the border to their summer nesting grounds. I’ve been hearing a lot more robins now, and I’m pretty sure that this fine bird is one of our own migrants returning for the summer. It was quite willing to let me get a good shot as it poked around in one of the apple tree in our front field.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @  300mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/1300″ exposure.

Rolling & Flowing

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High water in Fargo Brook

Rain, warm temperatures, and rapid snow melt make for fast moving water in Fargo Brook where a branch of a fallen tree cuts the water. Dialing in the right shutter speed freezes the action creating a satisfying sense of flow.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @  140mm, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/30″ exposure.

Powder Smiles

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Smiles all around at the top of Bald Hill yesterday morning.

The posse was in good spirits at the top of Bald Hill yesterday morning as we transitioned for our first run in untracked powder. A perfect day!

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 14mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/400″ exposure.

Curious…

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A curious chipmunk gets close

We came across the crew of chipmunks on the top of what we’re now calling “Chipmunk Hill” up above East Street and Delfrate Road. They were not particularly shy. Several were bold enough to come within a couple of feet of us, and both Robin and I were wondering if they might crawl up our legs in their flighty curiosity.

Given that we didn’t have much cold weather in February, I wasn’t particularly surprised to see so much chipmunk activity. They spend the cold months in a torpor state (as opposed to true hibernation) and start emerging as the temperatures warm in March to kick off their spring breeding season. The seven or eight chipmunks we saw were no doubt “busy”…

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 140mm, ISO 800, f/9, 1/500″ exposure.

Emerging

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A moss covered rock emerges from a frozen vernal pool

While exploring the top of “Chipmunk Hill” the other day, we came across a couple of still frozen vernal pools. This moss covered rock looks like the iris of an eye carved in the ice.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 34mm, ISO 800, f/14, 1/500″ exposure.

Ripples & Ice

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Ripples, pebbles, and ice in Fargo Brook

With the sun on the water, the right shutter speed accentuates the ripple distortions across the pebbles on the stream bed. A thin skim of ice provides something solid for the eye to rest on. I’ve found that between 1/200″ and 1/300″ exposure nails the effect.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.

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