Search

John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Tag

trees

Magnolia

magnolia
Magnolia blooming in our back yard

The magnolia tree in our back yard is in full bloom right now. It’s always a treat to watch the fat furry buds on this tree crack open and burst like slow motion fireworks. But, alas, it’s a short lived celebration as the blossoms are already starting to fall apart.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @  218mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/5000″ exposure.

Advertisements

Snowy spruce

spruce-snow
A red spruce at the edge of our field sports a mantle of snow this morning

Yesterday’s surprise snow storm made for a pretty morning as the sun rose in a cloudless sky. With a strong southerly airflow, temperatures rose quickly and the 4″ of snow we received is on its way to melting.

According to Mary Holland, this is a boom year for conifer cones, and my observations from around our area bares this out. Those critters that feed on conifer cones—red squirrels, voles, waxwings, chickadees, nuthatches, grosbeaks, crossbills, and siskins—should see a bit of a bump in their numbers next breeding season.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 84mm, ISO 800, f/10, 1/640″ exposure.

Dogwood berries

dogwood-berries-2
Dogwood berries against the sky

There’s a clutch of pagoda dogwood along Taft Road that have been beckoning my to take some photos. The dark purple-black berries on their bright red stems contrast so well with the green foliage. A shallow depth of field allows for some ethereal bokeh of the blue sky beyond.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/5, 1/640″ exposure.

Wild Apple

apple-blossom-2
Wild apple blooming

We have quite a number of wild apple trees in our front field and down in the back yard along Fargo Brook. My guess is that, over the years, deer have propagated the trees by muching apples from one and depsoitig the seeds elsewhere. We’ve pruned a few of these trees, and they provide us with apples for cider and apple sauce. This looks to be another good year if we can avoid a late frost.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/4, 1/2500″ exposure.

Amelanchier

shad-bush
Amelanchier blooming along Taft Road

Amelanchier (also known as serviceberry, shadbush, and shadblow, among others) is a flowering shrub that blooms this time of year. Its white blossoms are quite visible in the woods before the rest of the neighboring trees have leafed out.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1250, f/2.8, 1/4000″ exposure.

 

Willow

willow
Willows pop in our front field

Many species of willows are popping out now. These soft “pussies” are along the fenceline of our front field.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/13, 1/50″ exposure.

Iced

iced
Elm buds encapsulated in ice

The recent freezing rains (ugh) left a little magic behind in the form of a layer of ice on branches and twigs. These elm buds have a pretty thick coat!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/3.2, 1/2500″ exposure

Golden

golden-tamerack
Tamarack gold in our front field

We planted two tamaracks in our front field a few years ago, and they’re doing quite well. This time of year, these deciduous conifers turn a brilliant yellow-gold before dropping their needles. They’re one of the last brightly colored trees in the fading fall.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.

Magnolia

purple-magnolia

The purple magnolia in my Mom’s front yard is in magnificent bloom. The movers came today to take her stuff to her new apartment. All’s well if not a tad bittersweet. Transistions…

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑