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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

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flowers

Bleeding Hearts

bleeding-hearts
Bleeding hearts in bloom in our ornamental garden

Bleeding hearts are in bloom now in our ornamental garden. Though I usually photograph wildflowers, these showy cultivars couldn’t help but draw my lens!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 1250, f/4, 1/1000″ exposure

Wild Apple

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Wild apple blooming

We have quite a number of wild apple trees in our front field and down in the back yard along Fargo Brook. My guess is that, over the years, deer have propagated the trees by muching apples from one and depsoitig the seeds elsewhere. We’ve pruned a few of these trees, and they provide us with apples for cider and apple sauce. This looks to be another good year if we can avoid a late frost.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/4, 1/2500″ exposure.

Wild Oats

wild-oats
Wild oats in bloom near a local beaver pond

Wild oats (a.k.a. sessile bellwort) are in bloom. These diminutive plants grow in colonies. They spread asexually by means of long underground stolons (think rhizomes) with most plants in a colony not flowering. There’s a prodigious colony up past the beaver pond along the old Mailbox trail.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro, ISO 1250, f/8, 1/125″ exposure.

Red Trillium

red-trillium
Red trillium blooming along Taft Road

Red trillium (also known as wake-robin) is blooming along Taft Road. This wine colored three-petaled flower is a real eye-catcher against the forest floor this time of year.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro, ISO 1250, f/10, 1/160″ exposure

Bloodroot

bloodroot-open
The bloodroot down by the brook has finally opened all the way

The prolific patch of bloodroot we have down by Fargo Brook has finally decided to open up fully. I learned from Mary Holland’s excellent book, “Naturally Curious Day By Day”, that bloodroot will close its petals on cloudy and chilly  days, only opening fully when it’s sunny and above 47 degrees. It does this in order to save pollen and prevent self-pollination. When the temperature is above 47, some insect pollinators will become active and do the job. I noticed one such pollinator—a fly—doing just that as I was taking this shot. The fly was wary of me, however, and wouldn’t let me get a shot of it on the job.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro, ISO 800, f/11, 1/640″ exposure.

Jerusalem artichoke

jerusalem-artichoke
Jerusalem artichoke blooming against fall colors

The fall foliage is creeping towards peak here in Huntington. The colors make a fine backdrop for blooming Jerusalem artichoke along the Main Road in Huntington Center.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 102mm, ISO 800, f/16, 1/80″ exposure.

Last blush

last-blush
The white hydrangea by our back patio puts on its final blush of the season

The hydrangea by our back patio has sported bright white flowers through the summer. These flowers have been a magnet for pollenators of many species. Now, as we enter fall, the flowers take on their pink blush before drying to light tan.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, IOS 1600, f/14, 1/40″ exposure.

Hummingbird family portraits

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Papa ruby throated hummingbird

We have a prodigious bee balm patch over by the pond that is a favorite of all kinds of pollinators. We also have a family of ruby throated hummingbirds in residence this summer, and they were in full play-and-feed mode yesterday afternoon—zipping about above the flowers, chasing each other, feeding, and, very rarely, perching for a few brief seconds so I could get a shot off. Here are some family portraits.

Shots taken with Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens, ISO 1600, f/5.6, various shutter speeds.

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A juvenile feeding
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Mama hummingbird (or perhaps one of the juveniles?)
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A juvenile male takes a brief break from the action

 

Eye to eye

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Looking a black-eyed Susan in the eye

This wonderfully colored black-eyed Susan (rudbeckia) caught my eye as I headed for a swim at Blueberry Lake in Warren, VT.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/2.8, 1/500″ exposure.

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