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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

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flowers

Glory Blue

morning-glory
Morning glory blue

The morning glories that Robin planted in window boxes by our back patio seem to be slow and somewhat reluctant bloomers this season. However, what they lack in enthusiasm, they make up for in beauty…

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/5000″ exposure.

 

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Magnolia

magnolia
Magnolia blooming in our back yard

The magnolia tree in our back yard is in full bloom right now. It’s always a treat to watch the fat furry buds on this tree crack open and burst like slow motion fireworks. But, alas, it’s a short lived celebration as the blossoms are already starting to fall apart.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @  218mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/5000″ exposure.

Wake Robin

wake-robin
Purple trillium in bloom along Taft Road

The purple trillium—also known as wake-robin—is in bloom in the woods now. I love the deep crimson red coloring and the complex centers.

Panasonic GM5, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/8, 1/125″ exposure

Spring Beauties

spring-beauties-18
Carolina Spring Beauties blooming in the woods

The spring beauties are in full and abundant bloom in the woods up behind our house. There’s a veritable carpet of these little blossoms in a particular spot along the trails that I run in the morning, and they make for a sweetly fragrant run!

Panasonic GM5, Lumix 12-32mm lens @  32mm, ISO 400, f/8, 1/250″ exposure.

Frosted

frosted-chicory
Chicory frosted

Late season chicory sports a fringe of frost.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 1250, f/13, 1/60″ exposure.

Daylily dream

daylily-dream
A bank of daylillies along East Street

Daylilies are in bloom now and the bank of naturalized blossoms along East Street are putting on a good show!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 200, f/3.3, 1/4000″ exposure

Rugosa

rugosa-rose
Rugosa rose blooming by the pond

Fragrant rugosa roses are blooming in many locations around our property. This hearty and aggressively spreading perennial shrub can sometimes be a bit invasive, but I’ll take the sweet smell and bright blooms!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/16, 1/1600″ exposure.

Rye and Blue

grass-irises
Rye grass flowering by the pond

I’m always amazed at what is revealed when you get in close to a subject. From a distance (and without my reading glasses on…) these rye grass stems (please correct me if I’m wrong on the ID) don’t look like much. But on closer inspection, the tiny flowerettes reveal themselves. A shallow depth of field blurs the irises that were blooming behind.

I’ve been using my full frame Nikon again recently along with a wonderful Sigma 105mm macro lens. I’d kind of forgotten what wonderful photos this setup can take, especially with the magic bokeh!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro, ISO 800, f/11, 1/100″ exposure.

Apache Plume

apache-plume
Apache Plume blooming in Plaza Blanca

I came across this spectacular shrub while hiking in Plaza Blanca, New Mexico. I was drawn to the feather styles of the plant.

From Wikipedia:

“The flower of the shrub is roselike when new, with rounded white petals and a center filled with many thready stamens and pistils. The ovary of the flower remains after the white petals fall away, leaving many plumelike lavender styles, each 3 to 5 centimeters long. The plant may be covered with these dark pinkish clusters of curling, feathery styles after flowering. Each style is attached to a developing fruit, which is a small achene. The fruit is dispersed when the wind catches the styles and blows them away.”

Here’s a shot of the shrub in situ. Amazing that anything can grow out of solid rock!

apache-plume-shrub

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