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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

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New England

Fade

Beech leaves fade from green to copper
Beech leaves fade from green to copper

Beech trees are some of the last to drop their leaves—even holding on to them through the winter as they bleach to papery white.

Nikon D600, Nikon 50mm lens, ISO 800, f/1.8, 1/3200″ exposure

Pumpkins

Pumpkins await at the Towers Farm
Pumpkins await at the Towers Farm

Ralph Towers’s pumpkin crop was a pretty good one. Not a lot of pumpkins, but big. Some bared the dimples of a early summer hailstorm…

Nikon D600, Nikon 50mm lens, ISO500, f/1.8, 1/4000″ exposure

Soldier Fly on Grass

A soldier fly feeds on a blooming grass head.
A soldier fly feeds on a blooming grass head.

Here’s another example of macro photography showing you something that you otherwise wouldn’t see. This soldier fly was busy sipping on the tiny flowerets of this grass seed head. I didn’t see the bright red mass on its side until I blew up the image. I’m still not sure what it is – whether it’s some kind of bladder for storing nectar or a parasite of some kind…

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro, ISO 800, f/8, 1/500″ exposure.

Reflections on the Sky

Fair weather cumulus clouds reflect in a weathered window.
Fair weather cumulus clouds reflect in a weathered window.

The humid, rainy weather that we’ve been “enjoying” for the past three weeks has finally broken. We revel in the clear, cool air that is much more typical of Vermont summers. Here, fair weather cumulus clouds reflect in a weathered window of an outbuilding behind the Greensboro Library where my duo, the Swing Peepers, performed yesterday afternoon.

Nikon D600, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 30mm, ISO 800, f/22, 1/40″ exposure.

The Heart of the Milky Way

Looking south into the heart of the Milky Way
Looking south into the heart of the Milky Way

Last night’s clear skies beckoned, and I set up my camera out in the front field at around 10:00PM. The Milky Way stretched above me from north to south. In this shot, we’re looking south into the center of our galaxy. The brightest clump of stars directly of the above the trees in the center of the frame are in the constellation Sagittarius and mark the center of the Milky Way. Interstellar dust creates dark lanes in the stars as they arc north and east.

Nikon D600, Nikon 18-35mm lens @ 18mm, ISO 1600, f/4.5, 15 second exposure.

 

Lily Haze

A day lily in hazy, humid morning light
A day lily in hazy, humid morning light

I went out in the morning with my camera into the hazy and humid air that seems to be the rule this summer here in Vermont. I took several photos of day lilies and other flowers, but didn’t realize that my camera’s optics had kind of hazed up due to the humidity. Most of the photos were unusable, but this one had an dreamy, soft smoothness to it that I kind of like. I suppose you can pay good money for a filter that does the same thing (or do it in software), but there’s nothing like a happy accident!

Note to self: give you equipment time to acclimate!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm, ISO 800, f/14, 1/640″.

Patient Beetle

A very patient beetle poses for the camera
A very patient beetle poses for the camera

This as-yet-unidentified beetle waited very patiently on a pond side stalk of grass for me to get this shot. He’s a hansom fellow!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm lens, ISO 800, f//8, 1/250″.

Wild Strawberry

Wild Strawberry ripening along Fargo Brook
Wild Strawberry ripening along Fargo Brook

Springtime’s prolific wild strawberry blossoms along Fargo Brook are ripening into a pretty good crop of berries. I had to lay down flat on the ground to capture this image. And, yes, it was tasty as was its neighbor!

Photo Info: Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro, ISO 800, f/8, 1/60″.

Daisy Fleabane

Daisy Fleabane blooming in a clearing in the woods near Fargo Brook.
Daisy Fleabane blooming in a clearing in the woods near Fargo Brook.

Daisy fleabane in bloom in an old road clearing in the woods above Fargo Brook.

Photo Info: Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro, ISO 2000, f/13, 1/800″ exposure.

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