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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

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spring

Wake Robin

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Purple trillium in bloom along Taft Road

The purple trillium—also known as wake-robin—is in bloom in the woods now. I love the deep crimson red coloring and the complex centers.

Panasonic GM5, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/8, 1/125″ exposure

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Spring Beauties

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Carolina Spring Beauties blooming in the woods

The spring beauties are in full and abundant bloom in the woods up behind our house. There’s a veritable carpet of these little blossoms in a particular spot along the trails that I run in the morning, and they make for a sweetly fragrant run!

Panasonic GM5, Lumix 12-32mm lens @  32mm, ISO 400, f/8, 1/250″ exposure.

Willow

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A pair of willow buds popping

The willow buds that I photographed just peeking out a couple weeks ago are now in full “fireworks” mode. A touch of rain and a fly fill out the composition.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/500″ exposure

Pushing Up

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Bloodroot pushing its way up through the moss

The bloodroot down by Fargo Brook is starting to push its way up out of the soil. This little shoot was less than a half-inch tall.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/125″ exposure.

Spring Robin

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A fresh spring arrival!

We’ve had a couple of robins hanging around all winter (judging by their accents, I’m guessing that they were Canadian…) and they’ve probably headed back north across the border to their summer nesting grounds. I’ve been hearing a lot more robins now, and I’m pretty sure that this fine bird is one of our own migrants returning for the summer. It was quite willing to let me get a good shot as it poked around in one of the apple tree in our front field.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @  300mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/1300″ exposure.

Bleeding Hearts

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Bleeding hearts in bloom in our ornamental garden

Bleeding hearts are in bloom now in our ornamental garden. Though I usually photograph wildflowers, these showy cultivars couldn’t help but draw my lens!

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 1250, f/4, 1/1000″ exposure

“F” is for Fern

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A new fern curls to suggest its first letter

The ostrich ferns are unfurling along Fargo Brook. It wasn’t until I processed this image that I realized it suggested the letter “F”

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro, IOS 1250, f/4, 1/500″ exposure

Wild Apple

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Wild apple blooming

We have quite a number of wild apple trees in our front field and down in the back yard along Fargo Brook. My guess is that, over the years, deer have propagated the trees by muching apples from one and depsoitig the seeds elsewhere. We’ve pruned a few of these trees, and they provide us with apples for cider and apple sauce. This looks to be another good year if we can avoid a late frost.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/4, 1/2500″ exposure.

Bloodroot and tin

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Bloodroot and rusted tin

I couldn’t resist the juxtaposition of these lovely bloodroot blossoms and the rusted tin can that we came across the other day while walking along the Lamoille Valley Rail Trail in St. Johnsbury.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 81mm, ISO 800, f/9, 1/250″ exposure.

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