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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

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spiders

A hunter & its prey

jumping-spider-butterfly
A jumping spider catches its prey

While looking for critters and flowers to photograph today, I spied this spider and its meal lurking under a black-eyed Susan. When I turned the flower over to get a better look, the spider conveniently climbed to the top of the flower to pose for a shot. Kind of like a hunter posing with its kill… Not sure of the butterfly ID—perhaps a pearl crescent or a checkerspot?

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/13, 1/500″ exposure.

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Suspension

suspension
Dew beaded spider web strands

Spider web strands hold beads of dew like stings of pearls. The drops cling to the sticky material that spiders place at intervals along their webs to capture prey.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 640, f/8, 1/1000″ exposure

Pearls

dew-web
Tiny dew droplets on a spider’s web

Morning dew drops suspended in a spider’s web seem to float above the grass in this close up image. The drops are maybe 0.5mm in diameter and look like a fizz in the grass when you stand over them. When you get in close, their structure—and beauty—is revealed.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/10, 1/125″ exposure.

Waiting for breakfast

garden-spider
A banded garden spider (?) waits for breakfast in her dew dappled web

Yesterday morning offered a good time to shoots some dew soaked spider webs. A quick cruise of our yards and fields with my macro lens offered up plenty to focus on. This small spider (maybe a banded garden spider?) posed patiently for me in her web.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/5, 1/400″ exposure.

Consequences

consequences
The crab spider makes a catch!

Following up on yesterday’s “Dubious welcome” post, the little crab spider’s patience paid off as it managed to grab this honey bee as it visited the coneflower. I can only imagine the struggle as it’s hard to believe such a diminutive a spider could capture such a big bee. Quite the prize!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/13, 1/1000″ exposure.

Dubious welcome…

crab-spider-coneflower
A crab spider casually waiting for prey on a coneflower

I spotted this crab spider hanging out with open arms from our back deck. It was most happy to pose for me as I rattled off shots. Woe betide the unsuspecting insect who comes to feed on the coneflower!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.

Lurking

crab-spider-susan
A crab spider awaits its prey on a black-eyed Susan

On a walk this afternoon, I saw several black-eyed Susans with a crab spiders lurking amongst their petals. When I got in close, however, the wily spiders would duck under the petals. This spider, however, was more than happy to pose for me as I rattled off many frames.

This is the first time out for a new lens—an Olympus 60mm, f/2.8 macro. I think it’s a keeper!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/800″ exposure.

Lurking

A crab spider lurks in a mallow blossom
A crab spider lurks in a mallow blossom

I went on a bug hunt yesterday morning and came across this crab spider lurking in a mallow blossom below our patio garden. She was waiting to ambush the the right sized pollinator…

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro, ISO 800, f/14, 1/400″ exposure.

Beads

Tiny dew drops cling to a spider's web in the grass.
Tiny dew drops cling to a spider’s web in the grass.

These tiny beads of dew were clinging to a low-slung spider’s web in the grass by the pond. I’d say the largest drops were smaller than half-a-millimeter.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/16, 1/160″ exposure.

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