Search

John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Category

kayaking

Osprey’s Breakfast

osprey
An osprey enjoys a morning meal

Robin & I paddled around the mouth of Lewis Creek yesterday morning. We had the pleasure of getting in close to this osprey and its mate who were camped out in a tree on  one of the small (now inundated) islands out on Lake Champlain. This fellow had recently caught a fish and was enjoying a morning meal.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @ 300mm, ISO 800, f/11, 1/500″ exposure.

Taking off

red-tail-juvenile
A juvenile red-tailed hawk takes off above Rock River

Robin & I paddled up the Rock River  in Highgate Springs yesterday morning. This juvenile red-tailed hawk (I think…) was perched on wires running across the river near its mouth on Lake Champlain. It patiently waited as I got close enough to get a few shots, then took off to join several other of its probable siblings cruising and squawking above the trees.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 140mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/800″ exposure

Belted Kingfisher

kingfisher
A belted kingfisher perches briefly above the Poultney River

I’ve been trying for years to get a good shot of a belted kingfisher. These common denizens of streams, lakes, and ponds are quite shy and will fly away chattering as you approach limiting the possibilities of getting a good shot. Yesterday, paddling out of South Bay on lower Lake Champlain and up into the Poultney River, this fellow was a bit more patient with me allowing me to get in range and snap off a few shots before flying off. Mission accomplished!

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @ 300mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/2000″ exposure

Crepuscular

Crepuscular rays burst from behind the clouds above Indian Lake
Crepuscular rays burst from behind the clouds above Indian Lake

We were paddling on Indian Lake in the Adirondacks the other evening—dodging showers—when the sun streamed out from behind the clouds in a spectacular display of crepuscular rays (a.k.a. “God rays”).

Sony RX100mIII, ISO 125, f/4, 1/60″ exposure.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑