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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Month

July 2016

Consequences

consequences
The crab spider makes a catch!

Following up on yesterday’s “Dubious welcome” post, the little crab spider’s patience paid off as it managed to grab this honey bee as it visited the coneflower. I can only imagine the struggle as it’s hard to believe such a diminutive a spider could capture such a big bee. Quite the prize!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/13, 1/1000″ exposure.

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Dubious welcome…

crab-spider-coneflower
A crab spider casually waiting for prey on a coneflower

I spotted this crab spider hanging out with open arms from our back deck. It was most happy to pose for me as I rattled off shots. Woe betide the unsuspecting insect who comes to feed on the coneflower!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.

Taking off

red-tail-juvenile
A juvenile red-tailed hawk takes off above Rock River

Robin & I paddled up the Rock River  in Highgate Springs yesterday morning. This juvenile red-tailed hawk (I think…) was perched on wires running across the river near its mouth on Lake Champlain. It patiently waited as I got close enough to get a few shots, then took off to join several other of its probable siblings cruising and squawking above the trees.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 140mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/800″ exposure

Belted Kingfisher

kingfisher
A belted kingfisher perches briefly above the Poultney River

I’ve been trying for years to get a good shot of a belted kingfisher. These common denizens of streams, lakes, and ponds are quite shy and will fly away chattering as you approach limiting the possibilities of getting a good shot. Yesterday, paddling out of South Bay on lower Lake Champlain and up into the Poultney River, this fellow was a bit more patient with me allowing me to get in range and snap off a few shots before flying off. Mission accomplished!

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 100-300mm lens @ 300mm, ISO 800, f/5.6, 1/2000″ exposure

Along the edge

chicory-side
Delicate chicory stamens dusted with pollen

A close up view of a chicory blossom reveals delicate stamens dusted with pollen.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro, ISO 800, f/8, 1/320″ exposure.

Blue Damselfly

blue-damselfly
A blue damselfly rests briefly on some bracken fern

This little blue damselfly was zipping about in the bracken ferns along Delfrate Road as I walked the other day. The shade of blue is quite striking to my eye!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/10, 1/250″ exposure

Dusted

cinquefoil-bee
A solitary bee dusted with cinquefoil pollen

This little solitary bee was diligently gathering pollen on a rough-fruited cinquefoil blossom in our front field. I love the detail revealed at the center of the flower.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/800″ exposure.

Lurking

crab-spider-susan
A crab spider awaits its prey on a black-eyed Susan

On a walk this afternoon, I saw several black-eyed Susans with a crab spiders lurking amongst their petals. When I got in close, however, the wily spiders would duck under the petals. This spider, however, was more than happy to pose for me as I rattled off many frames.

This is the first time out for a new lens—an Olympus 60mm, f/2.8 macro. I think it’s a keeper!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/800″ exposure.

After the rain

after-rain
Sunset clouds, a crescent moon, and rising mist after yesterday’s rains

Welcome rain fell yesterday afternoon. We certainly needed it! After the showers cleared, the sky to the west lit up with fine sunset colors, and the crescent moon hung quietly in the sky above the post rain mists. I took this shot from the volleyball court.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 46mm, ISO 800, f/4.8, 1/160″ exposure

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