Search

John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Tag

macro

Glory Blue

morning-glory
Morning glory blue

The morning glories that Robin planted in window boxes by our back patio seem to be slow and somewhat reluctant bloomers this season. However, what they lack in enthusiasm, they make up for in beauty…

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/8, 1/5000″ exposure.

 

Advertisements

Morning dew

dew-grass
Tiny dew droplets catch the morning sun

Tiny dew droplets sparkle in the morning sun in this very close look at a blade of grass. The “large” central drop is perhaps on millimeter in diameter.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/250″ exposure.

Beaded

beaded
Morning dew on sensitive fern

Morning dew forms perfect beads of water on the tip of a sensitive fern leaf.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 1250, f/16, 1/500″ exposure.

Red Trillium

red-trillium
Red trillium blooming along Taft Road

Red trillium (also known as wake-robin) is blooming along Taft Road. This wine colored three-petaled flower is a real eye-catcher against the forest floor this time of year.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro, ISO 1250, f/10, 1/160″ exposure

Frosted

frosted-ferns
Dried ferns frosted along Fargo Brook

Moist air from open water combine with below zero temperatures to create fine frost crystals on dried ferns along Fargo Brook.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/11, 1/100″ exposure.

Two-tone with stone

two-tone
A sandstone round on two-toned sand

The beach a few steps from the cottage we stayed at on PEI was a wonderful place. This sandstone round caught my eye as it sat just above the line of wet and dry sand.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ `4mm, circular polarizing filter, ISO 800, f/14, 1/200″ exposure

Pearls

dew-web
Tiny dew droplets on a spider’s web

Morning dew drops suspended in a spider’s web seem to float above the grass in this close up image. The drops are maybe 0.5mm in diameter and look like a fizz in the grass when you stand over them. When you get in close, their structure—and beauty—is revealed.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/10, 1/125″ exposure.

Consequences

consequences
The crab spider makes a catch!

Following up on yesterday’s “Dubious welcome” post, the little crab spider’s patience paid off as it managed to grab this honey bee as it visited the coneflower. I can only imagine the struggle as it’s hard to believe such a diminutive a spider could capture such a big bee. Quite the prize!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 1600, f/13, 1/1000″ exposure.

Dubious welcome…

crab-spider-coneflower
A crab spider casually waiting for prey on a coneflower

I spotted this crab spider hanging out with open arms from our back deck. It was most happy to pose for me as I rattled off shots. Woe betide the unsuspecting insect who comes to feed on the coneflower!

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑