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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Category

water

Ice Bells

ice-bells
Bells of ice appear to float above the water in Fargo Brook

Cold temperatures make for fanciful ice formations in Fargo Brook. It’s interesting to ponder the process that creates these lovely little ice bells that are suspended from a rock and hover just above the water’s surface.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @  61mm, ISO 400, f/8, 1/640″ exposure.

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Rolling & Flowing

fargo-flow-stick
High water in Fargo Brook

Rain, warm temperatures, and rapid snow melt make for fast moving water in Fargo Brook where a branch of a fallen tree cuts the water. Dialing in the right shutter speed freezes the action creating a satisfying sense of flow.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @  140mm, ISO 100, f/7.1, 1/30″ exposure.

Ripples & Ice

ripples-ice
Ripples, pebbles, and ice in Fargo Brook

With the sun on the water, the right shutter speed accentuates the ripple distortions across the pebbles on the stream bed. A thin skim of ice provides something solid for the eye to rest on. I’ve found that between 1/200″ and 1/300″ exposure nails the effect.

Panasonic GX8, Olympus 60mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/8, 1/200″ exposure.

Pan Ice

cobb-pan-ice
Discs of pan ice forming on Cobb Brook

Robin & I took a short hike up Cobb Brook yesterday afternoon. I was confident that we’d find some interesting ice formations among the stream’s numerous falls and cascades. We were not disappointed. The hilight was finding these ice discs or ice pans floating in the pool beneath one of the larger falls. These discs form as ice accumulates in slow moving eddy currents. The discs ranged in size here from around 16″ to over 3 feet.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 14mm, ISO 800, f/8, 1/25″ exposure.

Ice abstraction

ice-abstract
Abstract form in ice

This abstract photo is actually a paw print. I’m guessing a coyote judging by the size and the placement of the prints across the ice. The animal was running across the thin ice surface of a local beaver pond and its feet were breaking through the slushy ice in places. Cold overnight temperatured had allowed for a thin skim of fresh ice to form in the print.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 40mm, ISO 800, f/13, 1/160″ exposure.

Suspension

suspension
Dew beaded spider web strands

Spider web strands hold beads of dew like stings of pearls. The drops cling to the sticky material that spiders place at intervals along their webs to capture prey.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 640, f/8, 1/1000″ exposure

Beaded

beaded
Morning dew on sensitive fern

Morning dew forms perfect beads of water on the tip of a sensitive fern leaf.

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 1250, f/16, 1/500″ exposure.

Hemlock Falls

hemlock-falls
Water cascades over rock shelves under a hemlock canopy

There’s an unnamed brook that cascades down from Taft Road to the Huntington River. There are a series of small waterfalls and cascades along it all under the cover of a mature hemlock forest. This falls had no name so I took the liberty of dubbing it “Hemlock Falls”.

While scoping the site for the best angle, I noticed the tiny mushrooms growing on a hemlock trunk. I framed the shot and cranked down the aperture to get everything in focus. The lighting was tricky for this shot as well. It was just past midday on a partly cloudy day, and a hole in the dense canopy was allowing sunlight to fall directly on the water and right side of the scene. I had to wait for clouds to cover the sun to get any kind of worthwhile shot.

Panasonic GX8, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 14mm, ISO 100, f/22, 2″ exposure.

Droplet

droplet
A drop of morning dew on a blade of grass

If you slow down, take your time, keep your eyes open, you just might see something special…

Nikon D600, Sigma 105mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/4.8, 1/2000″ exposure

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