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John Hadden Photography

Photography of the Natural World

Month

September 2015

Totally wonderful…

Last night's perigee moon approaches totality
Last night’s perigee moon approaches totality

I hope you all had a chance to see the eclipse last night. It was truly spectacular. We had a bit of a gathering here with a few neighbors. I had the observatory open and was taking pictures (of course…) but the best view was in a lawn chair under the stars. I think my favorite part of the eclipse was the way the stars and the Milky Way gradually emerged as the moon reached totality. Wonderful. And the color! Wow!

I took the above photo using my Nikon D600 and an old Celestron 6″ telescope as a lens at prime focus. My results were varied and not completely satisfying (at least to my level of pickiness!) This was a half-second exposure at ISO 640. I think the scope is an f/10 at 1500mm.

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Dusted

A pollen-dusted honey bee works a white aster
A pollen-dusted honey bee works a white aster

Our front field is abuzz with pollinators making the most of the warm weather. There are a variety of different insects working the asters—white, blue, and purple stemmed—and goldenrod. This honey bee is nicely dusted with a bit of pollen.

Panasonic Lumix GM5, Lumix 30mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/8, 1/640″ exposure.

L’écureuil souriant

The smiling red squirrel
The smiling red squirrel

This little red squirrel was quite busy in the hemlock tree right in front of the Studio steps. She’s been spending a good part of each recent day munching away on the fresh green cones that are prolific this year.

This little lady looks like she might be either gestating or nursing. Red squirrels are unique in that the females go through two breeding seasons. They breed from March until May, and then again from July until September. Their gestation period lasts for forty days, at which point they give birth to a litter which contains anywhere from three to six baby squirrels. You can read more about red squirrels here.

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Fire in the sky

Last evening's sunset was simply spectacular!
Last evening’s sunset was simply spectacular!

Last night’s sunset was spectacular! Fire in the sky!

Panasonic Lumix GM5, ISO 200, f/4.5, 1/40″ exposure.

Taste of nectar…

A honey bee samples nectar from bug bane
A honey bee samples nectar from bug bane

A honey bee samples nectar from the fragrant bug bane in our ornamental garden.

Panasonic Lumix GM5, Lumix 30mm macro lens, ISO 400, f/2.8, 1/2000″ exposure.

Picketed

White flox and fence pickets
White flox and fence pickets

White flox peek from between fence pickets in our ornamental garden.

Panasonic Lumix GM5, Lumix 30mm macro lens, ISO 800, f/2.5, 1/5000″ exposure

At rest, briefly…

An unidentified fly pauses in our front field
A hover fly pauses in our front field

A hover fly pauses briefly in our front field. Thanks for the ID Everett!

Panasonic Lumix GM5, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 140mm, ISO 200, f/5.6, 1/250″ exposure.

Red sky at night…

The sun sets deep red into the trees
The sun sets deep red into the trees

Yesterday’s heat and humidity made for a dramatic sunset as it slid behind the trees while we ate dinner on the back deck.

Panasonic Lumix GM5, Lumix 14-140mm lens @ 140m, ISO 800, f/22, 1/200″ exposure.

While the sun shines

Tim Taft gets a last cut of hay in...
Tim Taft works a last cut of hay…

The Brace Farm meadows along the Huntington River are seeing their last cuts of hay for the season (most likely…)

Panasonic Lumix GM5, 12-32mm lens @ 20mm, ISO 200, f/22, 1/80″ exposure.

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